Packer football facts - Scoring

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Paul Hornung holds the record for most points scored in a season. He had 176. That's 14.67 points per game.

The NFL record for points scored in a season is LaDamian Tomlinson who scored 186. It took him 16 games. An average of 11.6.

If Hornung would have played a 16 game season, it's safe to say he wouldn't only have destroyed that total but ended up with 234 points. A whopping 48 points more than Tomlinson, and the equivalent of 7 more TDs and 6 more EP.
 
Paul Hornung holds the record for most points scored in a season. He had 176. That's 14.67 points per game.

The NFL record for points scored in a season is LaDamian Tomlinson who scored 186. It took him 16 games. An average of 11.6.

If Hornung would have played a 16 game season, it's safe to say he wouldn't only have destroyed that total but ended up with 234 points. A whopping 48 points more than Tomlinson, and the equivalent of 7 more TDs and 6 more EP.
It's only getting worse with the addition of games and lack of context. For example, Bill Groman set the rookie receiving record in 1960 which stood until Puka Nakua broke it this year. But Groman did it in 14 games (instead of 17) and with a whopping 33 fewer receptions! Sorry, that's not the same accomplishment.
 
it's kind of like comparing jlo's 17-game stats to favre and rodgers 16-game stats. but that's not as big of a difference as some of those older records. wait until we get 20-game seasons.
 
While Hornug had the disadvantage of only playing 12 games, name last position player to regularly kick PAT's and FG's if it wasn't him, and return kicks, plus throw a few passes. He was a crazy good athlete, but nobody can really do that today beyond the HS level. His kicking stats weren't exactly impressive.. his career FG% was 47%
 
While Hornug had the disadvantage of only playing 12 games, name last position player to regularly kick PAT's and FG's if it wasn't him, and return kicks, plus throw a few passes. He was a crazy good athlete, but nobody can really do that today beyond the HS level. His kicking stats weren't exactly impressive.. his career FG% was 47%
No doubt about it, he was a different type of player, and scored in multiple ways, but points are points, and differentiating as to how scored would be like taking Henry Aaron's home run record and saying I'm going to throw out a couple of hundred of them because they happened on Sundays, and nobody should have been playing on that day.
 
IMO, you can't compare a record like that with todays players and talk about the number of games, and completely ignore other revolutionary changes in the games. It doesn't diminish what Hornug did, but the comparison isn't fair without talking about ALL of the changes in the game. I have no doubt that Tomlinson would have been as good of a FG kicker as Hornug and put up as many points, but that will never be allowed to happen now. Specialization has changed that.
 
IMO, you can't compare a record like that with todays players and talk about the number of games, and completely ignore other revolutionary changes in the games. It doesn't diminish what Hornug did, but the comparison isn't fair without talking about ALL of the changes in the game. I have no doubt that Tomlinson would have been as good of a FG kicker as Hornug and put up as many points, but that will never be allowed to happen now. Specialization has changed that.
Of course. You can't compare them. You can't compare any of today's stats against a past era. They aren't comparable. The only measure you can have is to compare a player's stats against his peers, playing the game at the same time as the player does. But the fact remains, the stats for "the most points scored in a season" does not specify how they were scored. I don't accept Tomlinson's record as having broken the Hornung scoring record based on 12 games.

Also, Babe Ruth hit 60 home runs in 154 games. Roger Maris hit 61 in a 162 game schedule. The fact is, Maris did not hit #60 until the 158th game, and #61 in the 162nd game.

I also throw out Barry Bonds 73 home runs as a record. Between steroids and a juiced baseball that's how he got them. I also throw out the 70 hit by the steroid freak Mark McGwire. Bonds breaking Aaron's total home record, really? Give the record to the steroid freak who wouldn't have come within a 100 of him had he not been juiced up and the ball juiced during his big run?

Stats and records don't mean squat to be honest. Not after what's happened to skew them.
 
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